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. >> that is a pretty shot. thank you, lisa. also cutting edge science turns to toys. we will explain why researchers would build >> welcome back, everyone. it's 6:46 on this sunday, january 20ing. thank you for getting up and watching the abc7 sunday morning news. for your viewing pleasure, a shot from our east bay cam showing you emeryville looking across the bay to san francisco. a nice day on tap as we've had for the last several days. lisa argen says a change is on the way. she will be here to explain in just a few. >>> the cutting edge of science also involves ideas so complicated it's hard to wrap your mind around them. but one innovative program in the bay area is trying to make scientific research more efficient by making parts of it simpler. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> when most people see a stack of legos, you see this, and this guy sees building blocks of science. his campus used piles of them to construct their very own working lego microscope. >> the microscope essentially is made out of two lenses. the first one is here. >> they did need to
annual conference on science, policy, and the environment, disasters in the environment. i'm the executive director of a national council of the science of the environment, and it is my distinct master of ceremonies for much of the conference. thank you for coming. lots of people are still outside, encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with co
akin. [laughter] a member of the house committee on science, space and technology. it's true. he's the kind of science committee. then there was the theory that romney was a very good candidate , didn't say things people understood, didn't connect with people very well and was somewhat awkward. for instance, when he went to michigan, his home state for that primary and said the trees for the raid had been michigan. the actual quote was i love this state. it seems right here. the trees at the right height. away from here i find no trees to please. no trees at such a perfect height as these. for me i cannot ever be at ease to grow one's knees. or two tall trees that splinter group wisconsin sure has bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where they take your skis. connecticut of course has lyme disease. [laughter] and none of these semi-prepared to say is currently here with the perfect perfect height of trees. [applause] and according to that theory, romney just was in a very good candidate. they should have nominated somebody else. and there is also a theory they were demograp
change and the announcement of science deniers was lauded by the left. of course it had to be. let's listen to the president say something that i don't think has been said before. >> we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to the ourselves but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> well, rush limbaugh challenged him today because people were listening to rush are driving cars and using up fossil fuel and they're not driving smart cars or priuses. no, they're driving big gas burners, but the fact is there's still that sort of no-nothingism, if you will, that -- i'm trying to think of the great word. you don't believe in anything. ludd
. the area is also subject to what we in science call multiple stressors. sometimes they are multiple insult as well. again, these red light con influence -- con influence of how how many and natural processes ongoing. there are a couple of highlight national problems in louisiana including the low ox yen area shawf show. sometimes called the dead zone. the high land rates in the area. the con influence of the oil and gas industry with the social structure that also depends on the living resources of fisheries. a lot of natural dynamic, the delta plain is continually changing and wants to change all the time even if people don't want it to change. local areas subject to sea level rise. substantiative of the coast, and of course, seems like always hurricanes that impact our coastal system so dramatically. the other issue is long-term sub -- it's a some thing will change no matter what we try to do. there are going to be many issues facing us as we go in to restoration of the area with funds from the restore act and the ideas that this should be based on the knowledge that we have accrued over
to rebuild it that way. this is the last part, from the science perspective. here's my ask. who's making the decisions about where we build, how we build? and if in a summit with the united states you're going to think it's the federal government. no. some of you might think it's the state government. not really. where do these decisions get made? local officials. whether their city or county commissions, land-use planning board. this is where the decisions are made every day wear, added up, the risk exposure occurs, but on a day-to-day translational basis you probably don't see this. but this is where decisions are made about where we build, how we build, types of building codes were going to enforce. right? yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure, particularly on the downturn that generate revenue how well the generate revenue? jobs and growth. have you ever seen anybody running for office thing i want our community to get smaller? it's always jobs and growth. that's like a mantra. that's how we go tax bases. they're having to make decisions that oftentimes our short-term
who wants to use digital download to make his own assault weapons. >> science fiction has become reality. all it takes is some liquid plastic and a state of the art 3 the printer to produce the parts needed to make an assault rifle -- stated the art -- state-of- the-art 3-d printer. the internet provided the templates needed. his idea of a free society is one where everyone can make their own weapons. >> we have seen this shooting. this shooting will probably end with the sandy hook shooting. the shooting will probably end with legislation banning this type of firearm, right? this file will still be on line. you see what i'm saying? it will still be able to reproduce. if you cannot buy it in store, look how much this project is important. >> the shafts needs time to dry. we will visit again tomorrow when cody will show us how to shoot with it, but for now, it is off to latexes gun show -- a texas gun show. gun sales spike in the wake of mass shootings. people want to show what they have and stock up on the latest gear. organizers did not allow us to film inside. >> evil does not
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> well, what do you think about hardened criminals serving time behind bars, you probably don't think about knitting. but in one prison in maryland, two retirees are turning dozens of convicts into converts with the help of yarn, needles and the zen of the stitch. >> reporter: barbed wire fences, watchmen towers and a group of men with convictions. hardened criminals. this is no white-collar country club. >> i'm arrested for armed kidnapping. >> attempted murder. >> reporter: but listen a little closer. >> i love knitting. >> reporter: and you realize there's more here than meets the eye. >> i'm knitting a small hat for a kid. >> reporter: that softer side appears every thursday around dusk. with two unusual visitors to the pre-release unit in jessup, maryland. meet lynn and sheila. you wanted to give knitting needles to hardened criminals. is that a good idea? >> for a man to have picked up needles to walk through that door, to say come on,
today. and why would that be? >> reporter: they say if you look at the science, it proves it. look at the times. they have gone down since armstrong's era and if you look at blood levels, you're not seeing the high levels where you saw more red blood cells, more oxygen. because they have the bio passport and instead of testing for specific drugs, tests for changes. so when they see those changes, they know a rider is doping. it's more effective. >> anne thompson has covered this issue and this man for years. thanks. >>> ray nagin, who as mayor of new orleans gained notoriety for his erratic behavior during hurricane katrina, has been indicted by a federal grand jury on 21 counts of conspiracy, bribery, money laundering, tax fraud and filing false tax returns. it's alleged nagin took flat-out cash kickbacks from city contractors. he ran as a reformer, even in the long history of corrupt government officials in new orleans, this federal indictment is a first. some time ago, ray nagin left new orleans and moved to dallas, texas. >>> more bad news for boeing after the faa grounded all
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. lori: baby, it's cold outside, the coldest it's been in years for many places but chicago hasn't been below zero degrees in more than 700 days. it hasn't had a inch of snow in more than 300 days. is that about to change with the cold blast moving east? janice in the fox weather center how long the sub-zero temperatures will last. >> this is old school cold, huh, ladies? i'm from canada. big puffy coats on. some places we're dealing with dangerous cold and dangerous wind chilled. air temperature combined with wind, what it feels like if you're not bundledded up and not protected. minus 23 in international falls. minus 18 in green bay. that is the windchill, the real feel temperature. that continues across the great lakes and northeast where it feels like 12 here in new york. a lot of new yorkers complaining today. minus eight what it feels like in buffalo and minus two in syracuse. windchill advisories, feels like anywhere between minus 30 and minus 50 below zero and where you see advisory, 10 to 20 below zero. it
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story "outfron"," playing chicken with the debt. today, president obama said again, not going to negotiate with republicans about raising the debt ceiling. >> if the republicans in congress have made a decision that they want to shut down the government in order to get their way, then they have a vote in the house of representatives to do that. >> the problem, that's what they say they're going to do. great to see you birthday. david, the president himself saying, i acknowledge it, a government shut-down is a possibility. cathy mcmorris rogers of washington state told politico, i think it's possible we would shut down the government. so here we are, we're getting to a problem. treasury secretary tim gietner said mid-february/march is as far as he can go. who blinks first? >> this is like one of the situations in the monkey cage at the zoo where the monkeys bang their chole their chests and look as powerful as possible. the president is escalating this situation. no 14th amendment opti
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. . >>> our second story "outfront," breakingous. cnn has learned that one american has been killed in the algeria hostage situation. i want to get straight to jill dougherty at the state department. jill, what can you tell us about this man who has lost his life? >> erin, the latest information we're getting is the name of that american who did die. it's coming in a statement from victoria nuland who is the spokesperson for the state department. she said that his name was fredrick butaccio and he died in that hostage situation. the state department is expressing its deepest condolences to the family and also the friends of fredrick. but they're not giving any details and that is one thing that has plagued it's information coming out of algeria ever since this began. we do know from a u.s. official that six americans, however, were freed or escaped, and others still are unaccounted for. earlier friday victoria nuland also said that some americans are being held hostage. so the bottom line here is that of it continues to be an operation w
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our third story "outfront," is the nra unbeatable. the powerful gun lobbying group has seen its membership grow by more than 250,000 in the past month and this is even more stunning. it added more than 30,000 new members on the day of the president's press conference. 30,000 people in one day. while president obama has made gun control a priority in this term, he's still struggling to get the american people on his side. the latest cnn poll show that is 49% of americans disapprove of how the president has handled gun control and that's even after this ad which was criticized by democrats and republicans alike. >> are the president's kids more important than yours? then why is he skeptical about putting armed security in our schools when his kids are protected by armed guards at their school? >> is the nra winning the gun debate even in spite of an ad like that? "outfront" continue aaron blake a political reporter for "the washington post" who wrote about this topic today and cnn contributors reihan salam and roland martin. you gave t
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. with multiple lacerations to the wing and a fractured beak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i said, he has a fractured beak. [ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card at getwellduck.com. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >>> a few short years ago the idea that america could become energy ipd independent, but it is within our grasp. i wanted to talk about one of the companies that is making the american energy renaissance possible. lpi. it is down in texas as well as a sizable position. you may not have heard of laredo. s
worse in history than they do in math and science. >> one of the reasons is that kids are bored by it because it is taught -- they know the ending. that is why history is not popular. we end up like a tv serial, the good guys who come out ok. they want the juicy stuff, the horrible stuff. when lynne cheney was at the national endowment of humanities, she was very active in suppressing and changing history books. texas has been very active in keeping what our leadership does badly out of the books. >> and that is the standard for textbooks all over the country, texas. >> i want to go back to the moment we first talked about, when henry wallace is defeated to be the vice-presidential running mate, as he had been the time before, for fdr. why did fdr give in? he had been so powerful? he had bucked the system before. he was a little bit more like obama today, but circumstances changed him. >> what changed him was the uprising on the left. in 1934, the massive strike movement, the rise of upton sinclair, there was a massive upsurge of the left in the mid- 1930's. the republican right
. the center for science and the public interest, a non-profit consumer advocacy group says sugary drinks are the number one source of calories in the american diet. they put out their famous version of the coca-cola bear called the real bear. ♪ sugar, sugar, so good, so good, sugar ♪ >> coca-cola said "obesity is complex and requires partnership and collaboration to help solve it. we have an important role to play in the effort to find solutions that work for everybody." let's bring in our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta. so i know it's a tough topic. coke says it can play an important role in america's fight against obesity, it says it's decreased the calories in its products. in middle schools it sells juices instead of cans of coke. it says it's doing its part. what's the big deal? leave us alone? >> i think that's part of it. there's a fear of regulation, we've seen it, you've talked about it in your piece from what mayor bloomberg is doing, the center for science and public interest has been very critical of what coke and other soft drink companies have done. it's n
. this is not based in science. martha: here's another issue that comes up with the children, alan. if you live in a family that has guns, hunters or has guns for their own security, that is how you grew up, what is the message you're getting from president obama if your dad and your mom believe that safe gun ownership is, their second amendment right and something they should not be a shamed of? >> no one is saying that. we don't know what the president is going to say. that is different issue whether or not it is appropriate for children to be present. that is a very separate issue. i don't believe the president's ever said that hunters should not have access to guns or take away guns from hunters. that is not at all what is being discussed today. and has nothing to do whether kids should be present. martha: i disagree. i think the message is sent to children, if they're raised in a home that has guns for security or hunting, that the message is that you're not like us and it is divisive to a certain extent. >> he is not talking about taking guns. >> hold on, it is pretty simple. let's not us
get the story tonight from nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell. >> reporter: jake is a perfectly normal 16 years old but when he was 2 years old, shown on in these videotapes, he was diagnosed with severe autism, the widespread disorder that affects a child's ability to have social interactions. >> he stopped relating. he wasn't interested in other kids, and by his second birthday he stopped speaking entirely. >> reporter: after two years of intensive therapy 40 hours a week, he was declared free of autism, and he remains so to this day. >> when i look at the videos when i'm 2 years old, i cannot believe that at one point in my life that was me. >> reporter: new research from the university of connecticut closely studying 34 such cases including jake includes the outcome is real. therapy does bring a cure in some cases, and it is often with kids who were severely autistic. >> they had very little language when they were 2 and 3 years old, and they were really, most of them classically autistic. >> reporter: but the good news comes with caveats. researchers caution
good works for charity all on a lie. when i hear people say our kids need to do better in math, science and history and the arts, i don't disagree with that. i hope that we would add that approximate if we teach our children to be smart and not honest and if their minds are filled with information and souls lack integrit yehonor . succeed in being great athletes and self centered self serving jerks it is not that our kids failed us. it is that we failed them. [applause] little reminder tomorrow, tomorrow is a day to pray in america. a day to pray for our country and leaders and i hope you will join your fellow americans for a day to pray. details at adaytopray.com. >> on wednesday president obama flank would by biden defended his action to go for a 23 step plan on gun without congress. >> it is based on the work of joe's task force . in the days ahead, i intend to use whatever weight this office holds to make them a reality. because while there is no law or set of laws that prevent every senseless act of violence completely, no piece of legislation that will prevent every tragedy, every
"the christian science monitor." she is the white house reporter for that publication. bachus through the president's day. >> it starts with a religious -- walk us through the president's day. guest: it will start with a religious service, near lafayette square. then they had up to capitol hill. as you said, 11:20, that will be the swearing in. i think that will take place closer to 11:30. then he makes his speech at 11:50. after that, they head into the capitol building for an inaugural luncheon. that is followed by a parade down pennsylvania avenue. in the evening, there are two inaugural balls this year. one is a commander in chief's all for the military, followed by the big inaugural ball. they have cut back from 10 to two. the second inaugural ball will be quite big. it is not quite as much downsizing as they are making it out to be. >> the president is only going to one location? guest: according to the schedule, he is at the first ball at 8:45, and at 9:10, he's at the other ball. he is a quarter years older, maybe he wants an earlier night. host: does the president of many tra
with muskets and militias. no single person can train all the math and science teachers will need to equip our children for the future, building the roads, networks, and research laboratories that will bring the jobs to our shores. now more than ever we must do these things together, as one nation, one people. [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steal our resolve and prove our resilience. a decade of war is ending. [applause] an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities of this world but that demands. youth and driver, diversity and open this, an analyst capacity for risk -- an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. we will see that so long as we see this together. host: the editorial page from "usa today." they wrote this about president obama, saying that a decade of war is ending -- host: fred barnes, executive editor of "the weekly standard," wrote this in the opinion state -- opinion section of "the wall street journal." host: mr obama was less explicit but his emphasis was on the
tou more than two years.n two ye >> some may still deny theill deny overwhelming judgment of science bu but none can avoid theg impact devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms.ith 11 mil >> reporter: with 11 million illegal immigrants in america,ngress to mr. obama called on congress topr provide a legal path tohip. citizenship. >> our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled fromm our country. >> reporter: mr. obama also recalled the newtown shootingch cause massacre which caused him to push for gun control and a polarizing fight with congress he previously avoided. journey i >> our journey is not complete until all our children-- in the streets of detroit to the hills of appalachia to the quiet lands of newtown-- know that they are in th cared for and cherished and the qui always safe from harm. >> reporter: there was one line tailored specifically fo
of fascism or communism with muskets and militias. no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future. or build roads and networks and research labs that will bring new job and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation, and one people. [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. [applause] an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands. youth and drive, diversity and openness. an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow earns most, we are made for this moment and we will seize it, so long as we seize it together. [applse] for we, the people, understand that our country can not succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. [applause] we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle c
that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthquake country. that fact was demonstrated by the different experiences in death and destruction in haiti where earthquake resilientcy is nonexistent and chile that took its playbook from california. that's why i'm optimistic that science and engineering cals make the coastle zone a safer place to live. there are important differences between the problem of earthquake hazards and coastal hazards. if we put aside those umph bumper stick thears say stop plate tectonics. huges have an effect on the rate -- humans have the an effect on the rate and the intensity of earthquakes. on the other hand, we have increased coastal hazards by increasing the rate of wetland loss anbar yur island erosion and sea level rise. what this means in addressing coastal hazards we need to confront both mother nature and the enhanced risk from impacts. i would argue the philosophy we have to approach this with is exactly the same. scientists can make recommendati
the arkansas of these conversations goes is it begins this sort of a conversation that h.g. wells and science fiction, you realize a few years later, that's what we are doing. you began at the right point about climate change now is integral to every conversation about urban design especially when you are situated on the ocean or a river rising, you say, we've got to do this now there is no question. i see there is a new report coming out if the from the federal government that says there is no question that these climate event did are triggered by climate change. we have to deal with it. we have to think in dramatically different ways. >> it's good to know people have that vision and see the need there. on the gun issue, elliott, i think andrew cuomo comes across as a real mensch and a real leader. do you agree. >> i think it's a good moment for new york state government. i think the next hard question will be when people parse the statute: what does it get done? does it do enough? i think it just is with the president's executive orders, acting is good becau
, a special report, the psychology and science behind cheating. join brooke baldwin right here on cnn. >>> the overall death right from cancer in the united states has dropped 20% from more than 20 years ago. this new report coming from the american cancer society. that means nearly 1.2 million cancer deaths have been prevented in that time. the report also projects there will be 1.6 million new cancer cases this year. but overall cancer cases are declining for most types of cancer. what does this all mean? with me now is chief medical officer and executive vice president of the american cancer society. welcome, doctor. >> hello. how are you? >> so these figures, they are just released this morning and you must be feeling good. >> this is really good news. you can look at survival by the number of people getting cancer a you can see, since survival is increasing we must be doing something well but you can also debate that. nobody can debate it when the number of people dying is actually going down. 1.2 million people alive today that wouldn't have gotten cancer. >> what type of cancer
't benefit from ignorance. we don't benefit from not knowing the science of this epidemic of violence. these are a few of the 23 executive actions that i am announcing today but as import-these steps are, they are in no way a substitute for action from members of congress. to make a real and lasting difference congress too must act and congress must act soon. i am calling on congress to pass some very specific proposals right away. first, it is time for congress to require universal background check for anyone trying to buy a gun. [applause] ville law already requires licensed gun dealers to run background checks and over the last 14 years that has cut 1.5 million of the wrong people from getting their hands on a gun. it is hard to enforce that law when as many as 40% of all gun purchases are conducted without a background check. that is not safe, it is not smart, it is not fair to responsible gun buyers or sellers. if you want to buy a gun whether from a licensed dealer or private seller you should at least have to show you are not a felon or someone we believe prohibited from buying
. how to stop talking about legitimate rape and insulting women, science 101, creating tax breaks and tax shelters for millionaire campaign donors and, after that ppp poll showing how unpopular congress really is, there's how to increase our approval ratings. what root canals, traffic jams, cockroaches, and head lice are doing to us. and republicans are presumably doing wrong i guess. >>> up next, the house of representatives will be voting tonight on a big aid package for the victims of hurricane sandy. but will republicans go along with it? especially from the south. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. southern tornado, for example, no one raised the question of spending cuts. but now in the northeast, when the aid was needed there, this issue of fiscal conservatism and trying to trim the budget in one place to help others elsewhere became so heated. so what you've got now is it was a process but they have passed more than $50 billion in aid. it covers a range of things including money for fema to rebuilding transportation and so forth. it has to go back to the s
:00 eastern we will examine precisely that. why we cheat, the psychology and science behind cheating. we're all over it. don't miss it tomorrow. that's it for me here m i'm brooke baldwin in atlanta. now we go to washington to wolf blitzer. "the situation room" begins now. >>> brooke, thanks very much. happening now, breaking news. americans held hostage in a deadly terrorist attack in algeria. we'll have the latest. >>> also, the president of the nra is here in "the situation room." we're getting his reaction to the sweeping proposals against gun violence. and the presidential inauguration only five days away. we'll take you inside the law enforcement command center working to keep him safe. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this is cnn breaking news. >> let's get to the breaking news. a deadly terrorist attack on a gas field in eastern algeria near the libyan border. some of the more than 40 hostages seized have been released but a number of them are still being held, including americans. the state department confirms those americans are affiliated with the oil gian
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. hershey's simple pleasures chocolate. 30% less fat, 100% delicious. >> cenk: we're back on the "young turks." we start with manti te'o. michael has more. >> guys and j.r., this is one of the most unbelievable stories i have ever heard. this guy, notre dame player has a girlfriend that inspired his season, but the girlfriend may not exist the girlfriend died, the girlfriend may not have ever lived. let's let nbc tell us more about it. >> the love of my life. >> that love supposedly losing her battle with leukemia. miss decision to play against michigan instead of going to her funeral. >> she had so many problems, and that you'll play and honor me. >> his performance on the field made him a front runner for the heisman trophy. it turns out the girlfriend homogamete on line, never had leukemia, never died, never existed. manti te'o said he was duped. >> the big question is whether he was duped or he was trying to do that people. >> uh-huh. >> he will talk more about whether it was his doing, but basical
sat down tonight with robert smith the professor of political science at san francisco state university. we asked him what should be expected during president obama's second term in office. >> it's just going to be i think for the next two years in a way just a series of arguments about the budget debts and deficits. i don't see him having an opportunity in the first two years of getting much done. >> reporter: smith said president obama will be remembered for what he's already accomplished. he pointed to the president's efforts to shift resources from the wealthy toward the middle class and those with lower incomes as well as his push for health care reform. >> a new poll shows president obama has some challenges ahead. the wall street journal survey found mr. obama with a 52% disapproval. when asked where america is heading, 33% had positive comments and 58 negative. >>> our ken pritchett and tori campbell are headed to the capital. they will have reports continues through inauguration day on monday. >>> a major new honda recall to tell you about tonight. >> also coming up
the professor of political science at san francisco state university. we e next two years in a way just a series of arguments about the budget debts and deficits. i don't see him having an opportunity in the first two years of getting much done. >> reporter: smith said president obama will be remembered for what he's already accomplished. he pointed to the president's efforts to shift resources from the wealthy toward the middle class and those with lower incomes as well as his push for health care reform. >> a new poll shows president obama has some challenges ahead. the wall street journal survey found mr. obama with a 52% disapproval. when asked where america is heading, 33% had positive comments and 58 negative. >>> our ken pritchett and tori campbell are headed to the capital. they will have reports continues through inauguration day on monday. >>> a major new honda recall to tell you about tonight. >> also coming up the change in security that you'll notice at two bay area airports. >> the advertised warm up has arrived. coming up the warmest day of the holiday weekend and when >>> new vi
of the nation, but also makes it more difficult to argue for abortion when science and miracle of ultrasound now allows us and mothers to get a look my the womb to see a living, breathing person. activists have fought this, a testament to their raw disregard for both mother and child. planned parenthood the mother load under attack while american taxpayers paid for half its budget. $542 million according to the latest report. planned parenthood insists to provide for the health of women, but privately even the own members speculate the real reason is to provide contraception. there is strong argument to hold the radical leftists of the abortion movement for the responsible for the problems with the cull legislature, sue suicide, contempt for morality and religion. granted cynicism and vulgarity and you hold life cheap there is little protect. so in the march of stars and parade of abortions, wonder women begins, who will remember the silent wail of 55 million children who died to make it more convenient for their mothers? >> eric: new concerns over our nation's federal spending. new government r
, gays kamal people, the disabled. and i'm also an ira of science. found out all those things today and yet president obama said that we are a unit country. lou: we understand thaat progras are iinadequate. if we could put this out to the audience. we understand that outworn programs are inadequate to the needs of our time, we must harness new ideas and technology to remake our government. that is what will give real meaning to our ceed. in other words, the founding principles and values of the nation had no reality unless we make our government and apparently support some ideas and technology that are not even available right now. >> he hates the constitution. that's when it comes down to. we have to adapt founding principles to our changing times and needs. we must change. you know what, the constitution was written with an unchanging you of human nature in mind. the left believes it is the only thing that can change human nature on a fundamental level, corrective action. the constitution stands in the way of their grand plan to change human nature. that is why everything you hear
, no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the futures or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs to our shores. who is suggesting one person can do this? what he's trying to say there is, you can't do it. communities can't do it. businesses can't do it. groups of private individuals, private sector can't do it. we've got it give it all to washington to do, but no one is making the argument that even suggests that. here is another one. we reject the belief that america must choose caring for the generation that built this country and building the generation that built this future. who is saying this? taking everybody on social security and roll them over the cliff? the straw man argument. and what got me, the focus, what are the issues facing america today. on this day, fewer americans are working than were working four years ago. >> sean: 8.3 million. >> yeah, and at the current rate of job creation, it's going to take us 26 more months just to get back to that point in 2007 when we went in
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